KCMA CERTIFICATIONS: 45+ YEARS OF QUALITY

OSHA is preparing to start making public the hospitalization and amputation information that employers are required to submit. It was suggested that by OSHA Administrator David Michaels that making summaries of the incidents available on OSHA's website within “the next few weeks” will encourage researchers and others to examine injury trends in specific locations and industries.

Since Jan. 1, 2015, employers must notify the Occupational Safety and Health Administration within 24 hours of any incident where a worker is admitted to a hospital, suffers an amputation, or loses the use of an eye (79 Fed. Reg. 56,141). In the mandate's first year, 10,388 reports were submitted.

The summaries, in a spreadsheet format, will include the name and address of each business filing a report in 2015. There also will be information about the event, such as the cause of the accident and the body part injured. The summaries won't identify injured workers.

The sharing of the accident reports is part of a larger OSHA effort to make employer injury and illness data widely available. On May 11, OSHA issued a final rule (RIN:1218-AC49) requiring about 466,000 worksites, including all with 250 or more employees, to submit electronically to the agency their annual OSHA injury and illness log data (81 Fed. Reg. 29,624).https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=31860

Starting in 2017, OSHA will post the reports, scrubbed of personal identification information, on its website.

The electronic recordkeeping rule, which also includes provisions regulating incentive programs and drug testing, has been criticized by many business groups and Republican lawmakers as OSHA's attempt to shame employers by posting their injury and illness data online.